Top Ten

May 25, 2018

ON colleges call on candidates to expand, give more autonomy to college programming

Colleges across Ontario say that they want candidates in the upcoming provincial elections to make a priority of giving colleges better support and more autonomy in creating new programs. In a statement released this week, Algonquin College President Cheryl Jensen stated that colleges “must be given the ability to adapt and develop cutting-edge programming to meet the demands of a rapidly changing workforce.” Canadore College President George Burton and St Lawrence College President Glenn Vollebregt have also called for the expansion of degree programs at the province’s colleges. Ottawa Citizen | North Bay Nugget | SLC

Large companies commit to hiring 40,000 Canadian youth

Eight large companies have come together to hire 40,000 Canadian youth facing employment barriers over the next five years. CBC reports that Starbucks, Walmart, Chipotle, HMSHost, Tridel Corporation, The Source, Coast Capital Savings, and Telus announced Wednesday morning that they would pursue the hiring initiative under the common banner of Opportunity for All Youth (OFAY). The initiative is backed by the MaRS Discovery District and local governments, and will target youths who are not employed, in education or training—or NEET youths—between the ages of 16 and 29. CBC

QC government to invest $94M in HEC Montréal building project

Quebec’s provincial government announced that it will provide $94 toward a new building for HEC Montréal. According to a release, the building, to be located in Montreal’s business district, will house the School’s MBA and Executive Education programs, in addition to several graduate diploma and certificate courses. “The new building in the heart of the city’s business district is sure to add new vitality to our relations and partnerships with businesses and public organizations,” said HEC Montréal Director Michel Patry. The Montreal Gazette reports that the proposal has raised some concerns for neighbours and local activists who say that construction will encroach upon a green space. HEC | Montreal Gazette

Aurora College President resigns

Jane Arychuk has resigned as President of Aurora College. CBC reports that the move leaves the college without a permanent president or a board of governors, and that it comes just days before the Northwest Territories’ Legislative Assembly is scheduled to discuss a review of Aurora that took place in 2017. Proposed cuts to the college’s teacher education and social work programs are said to have been deferred until the review’s completion. According to a government release, Caroline Cochrane, the Northwest Territories’ Minister of Education, Culture and Employment, has appointed Jeff O’Keefe, current VP of Student Affairs, as interim President. CBC | Nation Talk

“Post-truth” era presents new challenges for PSE leaders

The “post-truth” era of alternative facts, personally politics, and fake news presents unique challenges to the higher education sector, writes John Ross. According to many international PSE leaders, universities must meet this challenge “head-on rather than retreating into an isolated comfort zone of teaching and research.” The article goes on to describe an initiative undertaken by an Australian university that provides industry, government, and community organizations with a hub for expert advice. Ross states that the program will operate according to timeframes dictated by the 24-hour news cycle, rather than academic publication patterns. Times Higher Ed

UWindsor Board of Governors green lights $73M sports facility

The University of Windsor’s Board of Governors has approved construction of a new sports and recreation complex. CBC reports that the cost of the $73M facility will be split between students and the university. According to CBC, students voted in favour of covering $55M over the next 30 years. “No student will pay any fee until the academic year in which the building is open [has started] ... The initial fee will be $125,” said UWindsor Dean of Human Kinetics Michael Khan. The new building will feature a triple-gymnasium with seating for 2,700, an eight-lane pool, 12,000-foot fitness facility, and five multi-purpose rooms. CBC | Windsor Star  

UNB, Canada House sign MOU for cannabis research

The University of New Brunswick and Canada House have announced a Memorandum of Understanding to foster research on the potential health benefits of cannabis. “Our faculty and staff, combined with Canada House’s professionals, will lead the way in developing and executing multiple shared projects that will be at the forefront of this type of research,” said UNB VP of Research David McGee. According to a release, the partnership will facilitate possible collaborations in education, technology platforms, analytics and clinical and medical research, as well as plant research and genomics. Stockhouse

Selkirk receives federal grant for forestry research

Selkirk College has received a five-year, $1.7M grant to support forest industry research. Selkirk states that the federal grant will allow the college to partner with forestry companies, other educational institutions, government agencies, and venture capitalists. “Through this funding, we will build collaboration by bringing stakeholders together in a way that is both exciting and beneficial for the future of our region,” said Dean of Applied Research and Innovation Rhys Andrews. A Selkirk release notes that the five-year project will also create 30 summer internships. Selkirk

UManitoba raises tuition 6.6%

CBC has learned that the University of Manitoba has approved a 6.6% tuition increase for all students in the 2018-19 academic year. The hike follows provincial legislation that lifts caps on tuition, which allows institutions to increase fees by 5% plus the rate of inflation. University of Manitoba Student Union President Jakob Sanderson and VP of Advocacy Sarah Bonner-Proulx, both of whom sit on the Board of Governors, voted against the increase. In a release, the UMSU stated that UManitoba should provide free educational resources in classrooms instead of requiring students to buy textbooks. Earlier this month, CBC reported that the University of Winnipeg approved a 6.6% increase as well. CBC

UManitoba raises tuition 6.6%

CBC has learned that the University of Manitoba has approved a 6.6% tuition increase for all students in the 2018-19 academic year. The hike follows provincial legislation that lifts caps on tuition, which allows institutions to increase fees by 5% plus the rate of inflation. University of Manitoba Student Union President Jakob Sanderson and VP of Advocacy Sarah Bonner-Proulx, both of whom sit on the Board of Governors, voted against the increase. In a release, the UMSU stated that UManitoba should provide free educational resources in classrooms instead of requiring students to buy textbooks. Earlier this month, CBC reported that the University of Winnipeg approved a 6.6% increase as well. CBC

Spartan Controls donates $4.3M, renews partnership with NAIT

Spartan Controls and the Northern Alberta Institute of Technology have renewed their partnership. The announcement was accompanied by a $4.3M donation in support of the polytechnic’s Instrumentation Technology, Alternative Energy Technology, Power Engineering, Water and Wastewater Technology and Millwright programs. “We believe collaboration and innovation go hand in hand in solving today’s industry challenges, creating a bright future for the communities where we work and live,” stated Spartan President and CEO Grant Wilde. The agreement is said to include program equipment, software, and services, in addition to scholarships and bursaries. NAIT