Top Ten

March 18, 2021

Humber launches nursing degree through ON pathways for nursing education policy

Humber College has launched an independent nursing degree, making it the first college to do so through the Government of Ontario pathways for nursing education policy. Through the policy, Humber, which has been offering a Bachelor of Nursing program through collaboration with the University of New Brunswick, will now offer a stand-alone Bachelor of Science nursing degree program. “We have a long history of delivering high-quality nursing education and look forward to continuing that tradition by offering one of the first standalone nursing degrees at an Ontario college,” said Humber President Chris Whitaker. “This degree will prepare students for healthcare careers through our signature polytechnic mix of career-focused theory and hands-on learning.” ON | Humber (ON)

MRU launches four-year BSW degree

Mount Royal University has launched a four-year Bachelor of Social Work degree, which has received Canadian Association for Social Work Education pre-accreditation. The program will train students through courses in social work practice, theory, policy, and research, and will prepare students to work with children, families, and communities. The Calgary Herald says that the degree is unique in that it is the only degree in Alberta to offer direct entry into a four-year BSW program. “Social workers are essential workers and this pandemic above all else has demonstrated that social workers are positioned to help develop and strengthen connections between people. The BSW degree is something our employment community and our students have all asked for,” says Dr Yasmin Dean, Chair of MRU’s Department of Child Studies and Social Work at MRU. MRU | Calgary Herald (AB)

Reimagining digital learning environments: Opinion

Learning management systems (LMS) at postsecondary institutions need to be reimagined to provide students with adequate support, writes Steven Mintz. The author explains that the digital learning environments that vendors provide are often clunky and difficult to use. Mintz suggests that the LMS should be student centred, comprehensive, and integrated, as well as providing resources such as an academic calendar, dashboard, and communication tools. The author gives eight tips for the redesign of digital learning environments, which include reimagining user experience, reinventing the online experience, and providing data dashboards. Mintz also explains that students need their LMS to give them easy access to advising, enable network and portfolio building, and integrate active learning tools into courses. Inside Higher Ed (International)

Women in Red Seal trades earn on average half of what men earn: Report

A report released by the Labour Market Information Council (LMIC) and the Education Policy Research Initiative (EPRI) found that women certificate holders working in the skilled trades earn 47% of what men make on average. The findings showed that women in Red Seal trades made around half of what men made in the first year following certification, that women generally are over-represented in the lowest-earning trade category with exceptions in fields such as hairstylists, cooks, and bakers. “Our report acknowledges the sizeable differences in pay between men and women which, among other factors, may contribute to why few women participate in the trades,” said Steven Tobin, Executive Director at LMIC. The report additionally found that apprenticeship completers earn approximately 10% more than their trade qualifier counterparts. NewsWire (National)

Maritimes university enrolment remains stable during pandemic: Report

The Maritime Provinces Higher Education Commission (MPHEC) has reported that enrolment in Maritime universities has remained stable during the COVID-19 pandemic. The number of international students decreased by 3.8%, while the number of Atlantic province students increased by 1.1%. The number of Canadian students from other Canadian regions increased by 3.9%. Undergraduate enrolment was up by 0.7%, while graduate enrolment fell by 0.9%. “While this preliminary data collection gives us a big picture of enrolment trends in the region, the Commission will be conducting a more detailed data collection from universities at the end of the academic year to further explore the impact of the pandemic on student enrolment, persistence and course load,” said MPHEC CEO Catherine Stewart. CBC | Release (PDF) | Report (PDF) (NB | NS | PE)

Trent, Fleming announce four diploma-to-degree pathways

The Maritime Provinces Higher Education Commission (MPHEC) has reported that enrolment in Maritime universities has remained stable during the COVID-19 pandemic. The number of international students decreased by 3.8%, while the number of Atlantic province students increased by 1.1%. The number of Canadian students from other Canadian regions increased by 3.9%. Undergraduate enrolment was up by 0.7%, while graduate enrolment fell by 0.9%. “While this preliminary data collection gives us a big picture of enrolment trends in the region, the Commission will be conducting a more detailed data collection from universities at the end of the academic year to further explore the impact of the pandemic on student enrolment, persistence and course load,” said MPHEC CEO Catherine Stewart. CBC | Release (PDF) | Report (PDF) (NB | NS | PE)

Camosun, UFV, Lethbridge launch new micro-credentials

Camosun College, the University of the Fraser Valley, and Lethbridge College are offering new micro-credentials to fill industry needs. Camosun has partnered with Passive House Canada to provide three micro-credentials in Advanced Skills for Clean Energy and Efficient Buildings. These micro-credentials are stackable, and students are prepared to take the Passive House Institute’s Certified Passive House Designer exam. UFV is offering pilot micro-credential program in Digital Marketing fundamentals. The courses cover topics such as graphic design, content promotion, and report writing, and are stackable to lead to university credits. Lethbridge College’s Aquaculture Centre of Excellence has launched nine micro-credentials in aquaponics and food production. Students can choose the combination of micro-credentials that will give them the knowledge they need in the industry. Lethbridge | Camosun | UFV (AB | BC)

USudbury announces plans to break off from Laurentian federation, form francophone university

The University of Sudbury has announced plans to break off from the Laurentian federation to form an independent French-language school. Due to concerns about the effects of Laurentian’s restructuring on Francophone and Indigenous studies programs, The Sudbury Star reports that USudbury is making moves to ensure the survival of these programs. USudbury’s board has reached out to the Assembly of the Francophonie and Indigenous organizations to invite them to “help create institutions by and for Indigenous people, by and for francophones.” “We have to know our history to know who we are and to know where we are going, and the history of our federation is connected to our community — Indigenous, francophone, anglophone and many other communities, but those are core communities,” said USudbury president John Meehan. The Sudbury Star | Nation Talk (ON)

HEC Montréal, Living Planet @ Campus partner on environmental preservation events

HEC Montréal and the World Wildlife Fund’s Living Planet @ Campus program have partnered to engage students in events that focus on environmental preservation. Through the partnership, postsecondary students at HEC Montréal will gain access to sustainable development initiatives and activities that will be designed to address biodiversity loss and climate change. The School will organize at least three events each year, which will be chosen in consultation with students. Additionally, students will be able to earn WWF’s Living Planet Leader title through participation in both curricular and extra-curricular activities related to sustainable development. HEC Montréal (QC)

UAlberta pharmacy students administer COVID-19 vaccinations

University of Alberta pharmacy students are completing practicums through administering COVID-19 vaccines. Pharmacy students in their third year are trained to administer shots and practice this skill through a practicum that can last up to 32 weeks. U of A practicum student Mina Nagib described the celebratory atmosphere, saying that “[p]eople came dressed up to get their vaccine, wearing suits or traditional dress.” “This represents an opportunity for our students to participate in a much-needed public health activity that will save lives,” said Ann Thompson, assistant dean of Experiential Education for pharmacy students at UAlberta. “They get authentic, real-world experience to prepare them for the practice environment they are about to enter.” Edmonton Journal (AB)